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  Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

Deutzmann, J., Stief, P., Brandes, J., & Schink, B. (2014). Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(51): 51, pp. 18273-18278.

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Deutzmann, J., Author
Stief, P.1, Author              
Brandes, J., Author
Schink, B., Author
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1Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society, ou_2481711              

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 Abstract: Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as "nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation" (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments, the close proximity of oxygen-and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were very abundant at deep-water sites (profundal sediment). In profundal sediment, the vertical distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria showed a distinct peak in anoxic layers that coincided with the zone of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption, a strong indication for n-damo carried out by M. oxyfera-like bacteria. Both potential n-damo rates calculated from cell densities (660-4,890 mu mol CH4.m(-2).d(-1)) and actual rates calculated from microsensor profiles (31-437 mu mol CH4.m(-2).d(-1))were sufficiently high to prevent methane release from profundal sediment solely by this process. Additionally, when nitrate was added to sediment cores exposed to anoxic conditions, the n-damo zone reestablished well below the sediment surface, completely preventing methane release from the sediment. We conclude that the previously overlooked n-damo process can be the major methane sink in stable freshwater environments if nitrate is available in anoxic zones.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-12-23
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 6
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Internal
 Identifiers: eDoc: 700863
ISI: 000346767200054
 Degree: -

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Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : Proc. Acad. Sci. USA
  Other : Proc. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  Other : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA
  Abbreviation : PNAS
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 111 (51) Sequence Number: 51 Start / End Page: 18273 - 18278 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427230