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  Chimpanzees help others with what they want; children help them with what they need

Hepach, R., Benziad, L., & Tomasello, M. (2020). Chimpanzees help others with what they want; children help them with what they need. Developmental Science, 23(3): e12922. doi:10.1111/desc.12922.

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Genre: Journal Article

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Hepach_Chimpanzees_DevScience_2020.pdf (Publisher version), 897KB
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Hepach_Chimpanzees_DevScience_2020.pdf
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Copyright Date:
2019
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© 2019 The Authors. Developmental Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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 Creators:
Hepach, Robert, Author
Benziad, Leïla1, Author              
Tomasello, Michael1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497671              

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Free keywords: Children; Chimpanzees; Helping, Paternalism; Prosocial behaviour
 Abstract: Abstract Humans, including young children, are strongly motivated to help others, even paying a cost to do so. Humans’ nearest primate relatives, great apes, are likewise motivated to help others, raising the question of whether the motivations of humans and apes are the same. Here we compared the underlying motivation to help in human children and chimpanzees. Both species understood the situation and helped a conspecific in a straightforward situation. However, when helpers knew that what the other was requesting would not actually help her, only children gave her what she needed instead of giving her what she requested. These results suggest that both chimpanzees and human children help others but the underlying motivation for why they help differs. In comparison to chimpanzees, young children help in a paternalistic manner. The evolutionary hypothesis is that uniquely human socio-ecologies based on interdependent cooperation gave rise to uniquely human prosocial motivations to help others paternalistically.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-11-112020
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/desc.12922
 Degree: -

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Title: Developmental Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Hoboken, New Jersey : Wiley
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 23 (3) Sequence Number: e12922 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1467-7687
ISSN: 1363-755X