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  “He Who Sings, Prays Twice”? Singing in Roman catholic mass leads to spiritual and social experiences that are predicted by religious and musical attitudes

Wald-Fuhrmann, M., Boenneke, S., Vroegh, T. P., & Dannecker, K. P. (2020). “He Who Sings, Prays Twice”? Singing in Roman catholic mass leads to spiritual and social experiences that are predicted by religious and musical attitudes. Frontiers in Psychology, 11: 570189. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2020.570189.

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fpsyg-11-570189.pdf (Publisher version), 256KB
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2020
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© 2020 Wald-Fuhrmann, Boenneke, Vroegh and Dannecker. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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 Creators:
Wald-Fuhrmann, Melanie1, Author              
Boenneke , Sven1, Author
Vroegh, Thijs P.1, Author              
Dannecker, Klaus Peter2, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Music, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2421696              
2Theological Faculty, Trier, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3German Liturgical Institute, Trier, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: communal singing, group singing, social bonding, music and spirituality, Catholic worship, attitudes and behavior
 Abstract: Singing is an essential element in every religion. In the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church, theologians expect congregational singing to have several clear-cut effects which can be translated into psychological hypotheses. This study is the first to approach these quantitatively. N = 1603 Catholics from German-speaking countries answered an exhaustive questionnaire that asked whether and to what degree these putative effects were actually experienced by churchgoers. We found that people do, to a large degree, associate feelings of community and spiritual experiences with congregational singing. We also identified relevant intraindividual factors that contribute to the frequency of these experiences, most importantly, religious and musical attitudes. These results are discussed in the light of psychological literature on the effects of group singing on social bonding and wellbeing, but also in the context of theological, ethnomusicological, and sociological research on singing, songs, and spiritual and social experiences.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-06-192020-08-212020-09-17
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.570189
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 570189 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078