English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Error monitoring using external feedback: Specific roles of the habenular complex, the reward system, and the cingulate motor area revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging

Ullsperger, M., & von Cramon, D. Y. (2003). Error monitoring using external feedback: Specific roles of the habenular complex, the reward system, and the cingulate motor area revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. The Journal of Neuroscience, 23(10), 4308-4314.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
ullsperger.pdf (Publisher version), 336KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
ullsperger.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, MLNP; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
eDoc_access: INSTITUT
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Ullsperger, Markus1, Author              
von Cramon, D. Yves1, Author              
Affiliations:
1MPI of Cognitive Neuroscience (Leipzig, -2003), The Prior Institutes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634574              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Error detection; Performance monitoring; Reward; Feedback; CMA; Habenula; fMRI
 Abstract: The dopaminergic system has been shown to be involved in the processing of rewarding stimuli, specifically of errors in reward prediction, in animal studies as well as in recent neuroimaging studies in humans. Furthermore, a specific role of dopamine in the human homolog of the rostral cingulate motor area (rCMA) was proposed in a recent model of error detection. Negative feedback as well as self-detected errors elicit a negative event-related brain potential probably generated in the rCMA. We performed two experiments using functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the brain activity related to negative and positive feedback in a dynamically adaptive motion prediction task. Whereas positive feedback raised hemodynamic activity in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens), negative feedback activated the rCMA, the inferior anterior insula, and the epithalamus (habenular complex). These data demonstrate the role of the habenular complex in the control of the human reward system, a function previously hypothesized on the basis of animal research. The rCMA reacted only to errors with negative feedback but not to errors without feedback, which ruled out an influence of response conflict or uncertainty on its role in error detection by external signals.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2003
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 238998
Other: P6558
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : The Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, DC : Society of Neuroscience
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 23 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4308 - 4314 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925502187_1