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  Increased brain reward responsivity to food‐related odors in obesity

Han, P., Roitzsch, C., Horstmann, A., Poessel, M., & Hummel, T. (2021). Increased brain reward responsivity to food‐related odors in obesity. Obesity. doi:10.1002/oby.23170.

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 Creators:
Han, Pengfei1, 2, 3, Author
Roitzsch, Clemens1, Author
Horstmann, Annette4, 5, 6, 7, Author              
Poessel, Maria5, 6, Author              
Hummel, Thomas1, Author
Affiliations:
1Smell and Taste Clinic, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality, Southwest University, Chongqing, China, ou_persistent22              
3Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology and Logopedics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland, ou_persistent22              
5Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
7Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Objective Food odors serve as powerful stimuli signaling the food quality and energy density and direct food‐specific appetite and consumption. This study explored obesity‐related brain activation in response to odors related to high‐ or low‐energy‐dense foods. Methods Seventeen participants with obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m2; 4 males and 13 females) and twenty‐one with normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2; 9 males and 12 females) underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan in which they received chocolate (high‐energy‐dense food) and cucumber (low‐energy‐dense food) odor stimuli. Participants’ olfactory and gustatory functions were assessed by the “Sniffin’ Sticks” and “Taste Strips” tests, respectively. Results Compared with normal‐weight controls, participants with obesity had lower odor sensitivity (phenylethyl alcohol) and decreased odor discrimination ability. However, participants with obesity demonstrated greater brain activation in response to chocolate compared with cucumber odors in the bilateral inferior frontal operculum and cerebellar vermis, right ventral anterior insula extending to putamen, right middle temporal gyrus, and right supramarginal areas. Conclusions The present study provides preliminary evidence that obesity is associated with heightened brain activation of the reward and flavor processing areas in response to chocolate versus cucumber odors, possibly because of the higher energy density and reinforcing value of chocolate compared with cucumber.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-02-212020-12-222021-02-262021-04-28
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/oby.23170
Other: online ahead of print
PMID: 33913254
 Degree: -

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Title: Obesity
  Other : Obesity : The Official Publication of NAASO, the Obesity Society
  Abbreviation : Obesity (Silver Spring)
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Hoboken, NJ : Wiley
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1071-7323