English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Syntactic contributions to working memory: A behavioral study

Bonhage, C., Fiebach, C. J., Friederici, A. D., Bahlmann, J., & Mueller, J. L. (2011). Syntactic contributions to working memory: A behavioral study. Poster presented at IMPRS Neurocom & UCL summer school, London, United Kingdom.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-0A15-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C768-0
Genre: Poster

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Bonhage_IMPRS Summer School_2011.pdf (Postprint), 1012KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Bonhage_IMPRS Summer School_2011.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Bonhage, Corinna1, Author              
Fiebach, Christian J.1, 2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Bahlmann, Jörg3, Author              
Mueller, Jutta L. 1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, Germany, ou_634551              
2Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, External Organizations, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_421891              
3University of California, Berkeley, USA, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: working memory; syntax; rehearsal;
 Abstract: Sentences are easier to remember than ungrammatical strings (see Brener, 1940). There are at least two possibilities, how syntactic structure could assist remembering. First, it is possible, that syntax contributes to the phonological loop, e.g. as a chunking mechanism. Second, syntax also could have a rehearsal-independent effect: it could facilitate retrieval e.g. by storing or activating a structural template. In a 2 x 2 x 2 design this study aims to disentangle the effects of syntax, working memory load, and rehearsal in terms of reaction times and error rates. We find both effects of syntax independently and syntax interacting with rehearsal and working memory.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2011-07
 Publication Status: Not specified
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: -
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: IMPRS Neurocom & UCL summer school
Place of Event: London, United Kingdom
Start-/End Date: 2011-07-06 - 2011-07-08

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source

show