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  Exploring agency and self-other processing: an FMRI study of dynamic cooperation using an adaptively paced finger tapping task with variable auditory feedback

Fairhurst, M. T., Stelzer, J., Keller, P. E., Repp, B., & Janata, P. (2011). Exploring agency and self-other processing: an FMRI study of dynamic cooperation using an adaptively paced finger tapping task with variable auditory feedback. Poster presented at Neurosciences and Music IV, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-1036-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C324-4
Genre: Poster

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NMedin11_100_142_fairhurst_final.pdf (Any fulltext), 111KB
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 Creators:
Fairhurst, Merle T.1, Author              
Stelzer, Johannes1, Author              
Keller, Peter E.1, Author              
Repp, Bruno, Author
Janata, Petr, Author
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1Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              

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 Abstract: Ensemble musicians must be flexible and learn to adapt their performance to that of their partners and do so appropriately based on available sensory information streams. To further describe this type of dynamic joint action, we present a functional MRI study of sensorimotor synchronization with an adaptive “virtual partner” (VP). In particular, we investigate the behavioural and neural effects of variable auditory feedback (off, different to or same as pacing tones) associated with finger tapping performance across varying degrees of VP adaptivity (α). We predict that auditory feedback will bias the system to either i) integrate or ii) segregate information regarding “self” or the VP (“other”). We acquired subjective ratings of sense of oneness (self-other merging) and influence (self-other distinction) which we expected to vary with the availability and reliability (ambiguous-same vs. distinct-different) of pertinent auditory information. Behavioural data show a significant interaction effect of auditory feedback on α and synchronization such that distinctive self-other auditory information results in improvements in synchronization, especially at higher levels of α. Furthermore, auditory feedback was seen to have a significant effect on perceived oneness. Specifically, improved synchronization correlates with both ratings of oneness and activation of the precuneus and posterior cingulate, areas thought to integrate external and self generated information. By contrast, a comparison of neural activation in different and same auditory conditions reveals SMA and cerebellum activity. Identification of these structures may be related to greater sensitivity to prediction error as well as self-other distinction necessary for agency processing.

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 Dates: 2011-06
 Publication Status: Not specified
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Title: Neurosciences and Music IV
Place of Event: Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Start-/End Date: 2011-06-09 - 2011-06-12

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