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  Mere presence is not enough: Responsive support in a virtual world

Kane, H. S., McCall, C., Collins, N. L., & Blascovich, J. (2012). Mere presence is not enough: Responsive support in a virtual world. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48(1), 37-44. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2011.07.001.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-14FA-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C5BD-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Kane_2012_Mere.pdf (Publisher version), 433KB
 
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 Creators:
Kane, Heidi S.1, Author
McCall, Cade2, Author              
Collins, Nancy L.3, Author
Blascovich, Jim3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
3Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Adult attachment; Social support; Responsiveness; Couple; Stress; Virtual reality
 Abstract: When individuals are faced with novel or threatening situations, the presence of a trusted companion should reduce anxiety and promote feelings of security. Attachment theory assumes, however, that mere presence is not sufficient for establishing security; an attachment figure must also be attentive and emotionally responsive. To test this idea, participants came to the lab with their romantic partner and completed a threatening cliff-walking task in a digital immersive virtual environment. The presence and nonverbal support behavior (attentive vs. inattentive) of their partner was experimentally manipulated. Results indicated that participants in the attentive-partner condition experienced the task as less stressful than those who were alone; they also reported feeling more secure during the task and were less vigilant of their partner's behavior compared to those in the inattentive-partner condition. Those in the inattentive-partner condition felt less cared for and kept greater physical distance from their partner on a subsequent task. These findings suggest that human beings are predisposed to monitor their social environment for signs of responsiveness, and that perceived responsiveness, not mere presence, is the key modulator of emotional security.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-07-122012-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.07.001
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Title: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 48 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 37 - 44 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-1031
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922645035