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  Can you see me in the snow? Action simulation aids the detection of visually degraded human motion

Parkinson, J., Springer, A., & Prinz, W. (2011). Can you see me in the snow? Action simulation aids the detection of visually degraded human motion. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 64(8), 1463-1472. doi:10.1080/17470218.2011.594895.

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 Creators:
Parkinson, Jim1, 2, Author              
Springer, Anne3, 4, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
2Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
4Cognitive Sciences Area of Excellence, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Biological motion; Action–perception; Real-time prediction; Point-light action
 Abstract: Using a novel paradigm, we demonstrate that action simulation can directly facilitate ongoing perception of people's movements. Point-light actors (PLAs) representing common human motions were shown embedded in a visual noise reminiscent of “TV snow”. At first, the PLAs were perceived clearly, then occluded from view for a short duration, during which it was hypothesized that a real-time action simulation was generated tracking the motion's course. The PLA then reappeared in motion at variable visibility against the noise, whilst detection thresholds for the reappearance were measured. In the crucial manipulation, the test motion was either temporally congruent with the motion as it would have continued during occlusion, and thus temporally matching the simulation, or temporally incongruent. Detection thresholds were lower for congruent than for incongruent reappearing motions, suggesting that reappearing motion that temporally matched the internal action simulation was more likely to be detected.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20112011-08-032011
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/17470218.2011.594895
 Degree: -

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Title: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 64 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1463 - 1472 Identifier: ISSN: 1747-0218
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925255152