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  Effect of attention on cortical processing of sound motion: An EEG study

Kreitewolf, J., Lewald, J., & Getzmann, S. (2011). Effect of attention on cortical processing of sound motion: An EEG study. NeuroImage, 54(3), 2340-2349. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.10.031.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-15FF-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-B37D-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kreitewolf, Jens1, 2, Author              
Lewald, Jörg2, 3, Author
Getzmann, Stephan2, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634556              
2Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, DE, ou_persistent22              
3Leibnitz Research Center for Working Environment and Human Factors , Dortmund, DE, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Sound Localization, Auditory Space Perception, Hearing Attention, Electroencephalography
 Abstract: The onset of motion in an otherwise continuous sound elicits a prominent auditory evoked potential, the so-called motion onset response (MOR). The MOR has recently been shown to be modulated by stimulus-dependent factors, such as velocity, while the possible role of task-dependent factors has remained unclear. Here, the effect of spatial attention on the MOR was investigated in 19 listeners. In each trial, the subject initially heard a free-field sound, consisting of a stationary period and a subsequent period of motion. Then, two successive stationary test tones were presented that differed in location and pitch. Subjects either judged whether or not the starting and final positions of the preceded motion matched the positions of the two test tones (‘motion-focused condition’), or whether or not the test tones were identical in pitch, irrespective of the preceded motion stimulus (‘baseline condition’). These two tasks were presented in separate experimental blocks. The performance level in both tasks was similar. However, especially later portions of the MOR were significantly increased in amplitude when auditory motion was task-relevant. Cortical source localization indicated that this extra activation originated in dorsofrontal areas that have been proposed to be part of the dorsal auditory processing stream. These results support the assumption that auditory motion processing is based on a complex interaction of both stimulus-specific and attentional processes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2010-10-062010-02-082010-10-112010-10-182011-02-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.10.031
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 54 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2340 - 2349 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166