English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Seeing you or the scene? Self-construals modulate inhibitory mechanisms of attention

Springer, A., Beyer, J., Derrfuß, J., Volz, K. G., & Hannover, B. (2012). Seeing you or the scene? Self-construals modulate inhibitory mechanisms of attention. Social Cognition, 30(2), 133-152. doi:10.1521/soco.2012.30.2.133.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Springer_2012_Seeing.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Springer_2012_Seeing.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Springer, Anne1, Author              
Beyer, Juliane1, Author
Derrfuß, Jan2, Author
Volz, Kirsten G.3, Author
Hannover, Bettina4, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neuroscience, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: It has often been shown that independent self-construals (emphasizing personal uniqueness) coincide with an analytic, context-independent style of information processing whereas interdependent self-construals (emphasizing relatedness with others) promote holistic, context-dependent processing. The present study suggests that these cognitive variations between different self-construals can be accounted for by higher order cognitive functions for the control of ongoing mental operations (i.e., executive functions). Using an experimental paradigm, we showed naturalistic pictures displaying a face and a place superimposed on each other. On each trial, one of these dimensions served as a target (depicted in magenta), while the other served as a distractor (depicted in gray). The results showed that independency primed participants were less affected by distractors appearing in the presence of a target (i.e., smaller interference effect) than interdependency primed participants. Importantly, the independency primed participants revealed evidence of mental inhibition of distractors, showing longer reaction times when previously ignored distractors subsequently became targets (i.e., a negatively signed priming effect). Thus, our study is the first to suggest that differences in fundamental processes of cognitive control, namely, the inhibition of automatically triggered (but inappropriate) response tendencies, are the driving force behind the many previously reported differences between individuals primed for independency versus interdependency.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20112012-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1521/soco.2012.30.2.133
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Social Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York, NY : Guilford Publications
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 30 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 133 - 152 Identifier: ISSN: 0278-016X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925506283