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  Encoding: The keystone to efficient functioning of verbal short-term memory

Barry, J. G., Sabisch, B., Friederici, A. D., & Brauer, J. (2011). Encoding: The keystone to efficient functioning of verbal short-term memory. Neuropsychologia, 49(13), 3636-3647. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.09.018.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-2A15-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C3B1-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Barry, Johanna G.1, 2, Author              
Sabisch, Beate1, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Brauer, Jens1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2MRC Institute of Hearing Research, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Verbal short-term memory; Individual differences; Encoding; Posterior planum temporale (Spt)
 Abstract: Verbal short-term memory (VSTM) is thought to play a critical role in language learning. It is indexed by the nonword repetition task where listeners are asked to repeat meaningless words like ‘blonterstaping’. The present study investigated the effect on nonword repetition performance of differences in efficiency of functioning of some part of the neural architecture mediating VSTM. Hypotheses were stated within Baddeley and Hitch's (1974) multicomponent model of VSTM, with respect to regions of the brain known to be active during tasks tapping into VSTM. We were specifically interested in activations associated with the posterior planum temporale (Spt) which emerge during rehearsal since this region is hypothesized to be central to VTSM (Buchsbaum, Olsen, Koch, & Berman, 2005a). Participants performed a delayed reaction time task in the scanner which explicitly mimicked the three main stages of information-processing involved in VSTM (encoding, rehearsal, recall (here recognition)). The data for each stage were then convolved with scores from a separately measured nonword repetition task. Rather than observing a pattern of individual differences located to specific regions specialized for supporting VSTM, a dissociation in direction of correlation in overlapping regions of the brain was observed during encoding and recognition. Larger hemodynamic responses during encoding were associated with better nonword repetition, and vice versa during recognition. There was little evidence for a network of activations specialized for VSTM. Instead, the main correlations were observed in regions also known to be involved in long-term memory. It seems that individuals who are better at nonword repetition and hence at language learning, activate these regions more efficiently than poorer nonword-repeaters early after stimulus input. These observations are discussed with respect to various models proposed for explaining the phenomenon of VSTM.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-09-192011-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Degree: -

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Title: Neuropsychologia
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 49 (13) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3636 - 3647 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-3932
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925428258