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  Memory inhibition, aging and the executive deficit hypothesis

Ortega, A., Gomez-Ariza, C. J., Román, P., & Bajo, M. T. (2012). Memory inhibition, aging and the executive deficit hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 38(1), 178-186. doi:10.1037/a0024510.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-33DA-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-CC67-4
Genre: Journal Article

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Ortega_2012_Memory.pdf (Publisher version), 83KB
 
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 Creators:
Ortega, Almudena1, Author
Gomez-Ariza, Carlos Javier2, Author
Román, Patricia3, Author              
Bajo, Maria Teresa1, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Experimental Psychology, Brain, Mind and Behavior Research Center, University of Granada, Spain, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology, University of Jaén, Spain, ou_persistent22              
3Minerva Research Group Neurocognition of Rhythm in Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634560              

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Free keywords: Aging; Executive control; Memory inhibition; Dual task; Forgetting
 Abstract: Although memory inhibition seems to underlie retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF), there is some controversy about the precise nature of this effect. Because normal RIF is observed in people with deficits in executive control (i.e., older adults), some have proposed that an automatic-like inhibitory process is responsible for the effect. On the contrary, neurocognitive and dual-task findings with young people support the view that an executive control process underlies RIF. In the present study, we address this apparent controversy by comparing young and older participants under different dual-task conditions. Our results indicate that memory inhibition in older adults also depends on executive control, which is more easily disrupted by a secondary task in older than in young adults. Thus, the fact that RIF in older adults is sometimes present is not incompatible with a decline in executive control with aging. The results also shed some light into the discussion regarding the effect of dual tasking on retrieval.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-06-212011-07-182012-01-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/a0024510
PMID: 21767066
Other: Epub 2011
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association (PsycARTICLES)
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 38 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 178 - 186 Identifier: ISSN: 0278-7393
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927606766