English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A dual role for microbial pathogen-derived effector proteins in plant disease and resistance

van't Slot, K. A. E., & Knogge, W. (2002). A dual role for microbial pathogen-derived effector proteins in plant disease and resistance. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, 21(3), 229-271.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-3E34-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-3E35-4
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
van't Slot, K. A. E.1, Author              
Knogge, W.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Dept. of Biochemistry (Klaus Hahlbrock), MPI for Plant Breeding Research, Max Planck Society, ou_1113566              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: avirulence genes; pathogenicity genes; resistance genes; virulence genes
 Abstract: Many proteins from plant pathogens affecting the interaction with the host plant have dual functions: they promote virulence on the host species and they function as avirulence determinants by eliciting defense reactions in host cultivars expressing the appropriate resistance genes. In viruses all proteins encoded by the small genomes can be expected to be essential for viral development in the host. However, in different plants surveillance systems have evolved that are able to recognize most of these proteins. Bacteria and fungi have specialized pathogenicity and virulence genes. Many of the latter were originally identified through the resistance gene- dependent elicitor activity of their products. Their role in virulence only became apparent when they were inactivated or transferred to different microbes or after their ectopic expression in host plants. Many microbes appear to maintain these genes despite their disadvantageous effect, introducing only few mutations to abolish the interaction of their products with the plant recognition system. This has been interpreted as been indicative of a virulence function of the gene products that is not impaired by the mutations. Alternatively, in particular in bacteria there is now evidence that pathogenicity was acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Genes supporting virulence in the donor organism's original host appear to have traveled along. Being gratuitous in the new situation, they may have been inactivated without loss of any beneficial function for the pathogen.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2002
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 127301
ISI: 000176081800004
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences
  Alternative Title : Crit. Rev. Plant Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 21 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 229 - 271 Identifier: ISSN: 0735-2689