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  Synchronized drumming enhances activity in the caudate and facilitates prosocial commitment - If the rhythm comes easily

Kokal, I., Engel, A., Kirschner, S., & Keysers, C. (2011). Synchronized drumming enhances activity in the caudate and facilitates prosocial commitment - If the rhythm comes easily. PLoS One, 6(11): e27272. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027272.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0012-62A1-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C64C-5
Genre: Journal Article

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Kokal_SynchronizedDrumming.pdf (Publisher version), 272KB
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2011
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© 2011 Kokal et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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 Creators:
Kokal, Idil1, 2, 3, Author              
Engel, Annerose2, 4, Author              
Kirschner, Sebastian5, Author
Keysers, Christian2, 6, Author
Affiliations:
1Neurobiology of Language Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, ou_102880              
2Department of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
4Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
5Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Why does chanting, drumming or dancing together make people feel united? Here we investigate the neural mechanisms underlying interpersonal synchrony and its subsequent effects on prosocial behavior among synchronized individuals. We hypothesized that areas of the brain associated with the processing of reward would be active when individuals experience synchrony during drumming, and that these reward signals would increase prosocial behavior toward this synchronous drum partner. 18 female non-musicians were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging while they drummed a rhythm, in alternating blocks, with two different experimenters: one drumming in-synchrony and the other out-ofsynchrony relative to the participant. In the last scanning part, which served as the experimental manipulation for the following prosocial behavioral test, one of the experimenters drummed with one half of the participants in-synchrony and with the other out-of-synchrony. After scanning, this experimenter ‘‘accidentally’’ dropped eight pencils, and the number of pencils collected by the participants was used as a measure of prosocial commitment. Results revealed that participants who mastered the novel rhythm easily before scanning showed increased activity in the caudate during synchronous drumming. The same area also responded to monetary reward in a localizer task with the same participants. The activity in the caudate during experiencing synchronous drumming also predicted the number of pencils the participants later collected to help the synchronous experimenter of the manipulation run. In addition, participants collected more pencils to help the experimenter when she had drummed in-synchrony than out-of-synchrony during the manipulation run. By showing an overlap in activated areas during synchronized drumming and monetary reward, our findings suggest that interpersonal synchrony is related to the brain’s reward system.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-10-122011-11-16
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0027272
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 (11) Sequence Number: e27272 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850