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  Flow of affective information between communicating brains

Anders, S., Heinzle, J., Weiskopf, N., Ethofer, T., & Haynes, J.-D. (2011). Flow of affective information between communicating brains. NeuroImage, 54(1), 439-446. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.07.004.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-0270-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-B347-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Anders, Silke1, 2, Author
Heinzle, Jakob2, Author
Weiskopf, Nikolaus3, Author              
Ethofer, Thomas4, Author
Haynes, John-Dylan5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Neurology and Neuroimage Nord, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Berlin, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, UCL Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychiatry, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Max Planck Fellow Research Group Attention and Awareness, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634553              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Decoding; Emotion; Communication; Facial expression; Embodied simulation
 Abstract: When people interact, affective information is transmitted between their brains. Modern imaging techniques permit to investigate the dynamics of this brain-to-brain transfer of information. Here, we used information-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the flow of affective information between the brains of senders and perceivers engaged in ongoing facial communication of affect. We found that the level of neural activity within a distributed network of the perceiver's brain can be successfully predicted from the neural activity in the same network in the sender's brain, depending on the affect that is currently being communicated. Furthermore, there was a temporal succession in the flow of affective information from the sender's brain to the perceiver's brain, with information in the perceiver's brain being significantly delayed relative to information in the sender's brain. This delay decreased over time, possibly reflecting some ‘tuning in’ of the perceiver with the sender. Our data support current theories of intersubjectivity by providing direct evidence that during ongoing facial communication a ‘shared space’ of affect is successively built up between senders and perceivers of affective facial signals.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2010-06-232010-04-282010-07-052010-07-102011-01-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: PMC: 3081064
PMID: 20624471
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.07.004
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 54 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 439 - 446 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166