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  Sentence comprehension in proficient adult cochlear implant users: On the vulnerability of syntax

Hahne, A., Wolf, A., Müller, J., Mürbe, D., & Friederici, A. D. (2012). Sentence comprehension in proficient adult cochlear implant users: On the vulnerability of syntax. Language and Cognitive Processes, 27(7-8), 1192-1204. doi:10.1080/01690965.2011.653251.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-10DC-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-BFEE-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Hahne, Anja1, 2, Author              
Wolf, A.1, Author
Müller, J.3, Author
Mürbe, D.2, Author
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of Medicine, Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology, Saxonian Cochlear Implant Center, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Würzburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cochlear implant; ERP; N400; Sentence comprehension
 Abstract: Comprehending language via a cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis which stimulates the acoustic nerve electrically, poses a remarkable challenge to the brain. We investigated auditory sentence comprehension in a group of thirteen high proficient adult cochlear implant patients using event-related brain potentials. Four types of sentences were examined: correct sentences with either high (1) or low (2) expectancy of the sentence final word (cloze probability), semantically incorrect sentences (3), and sentences violating the argument structure of the verb (4). Participants judged the acceptability of the sentences. Relative to correct sentences with a high cloze probability all other conditions elicited a N400 effect in both the patient group and a matched control group, although the timing of the effect differed between the two groups. Moreover, whereas the argument structure violation elicited a late positivity in addition to the N400 effect in the control group, no such effect was observable in the cochlear implant group. We take these data to indicate that under adverse input conditions, processes of syntactic repair reflected in the P600 effect, are much more vulnerable than processes of semantic integration reflected in N400 effects.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-12-212012-03-122012
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/01690965.2011.653251
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Title: Language and Cognitive Processes
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Utrecht, Netherlands : VNU Science Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 27 (7-8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1192 - 1204 Identifier: ISSN: 0169-0965
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925267270