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  Culture and the body: East-west differences in visceral perception

Ma-Kellams, C., Blascovich, J., & McCall, C. (2012). Culture and the body: East-west differences in visceral perception. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102(4), 718-728. doi:10.1037/a0027010.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-4190-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-CD94-F
Genre: Journal Article

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MaKellams_2012_Culture.pdf (Publisher version), 150KB
 
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 Creators:
Ma-Kellams, Christine1, Author
Blascovich, Jim1, Author
McCall, Cade2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, ou_persistent22              
2Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

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Free keywords: Context; Culture; Physiology; Visceral perception; Cross-cultural differences; East-West differences
 Abstract: This research investigated cross-cultural differences in the accuracy of individuals' perceptions of internal visceral states. We conducted 4 studies to test the hypothesis that Asians are less sensitive to internal physiological cues relative to European Americans. Studies 1 and 2 assessed cultural differences in visceral perception via tests of misattributions of arousal: Study 1 involved false heart rate feedback during an emotionally evocative slideshow and examined subsequent self-reported affective changes; Study 2 manipulated apparent physiological arousal and measured its effects on attraction via an immersive virtual environment. Study 3 directly assessed visceral perception using a heartbeat detection task. All 3 studies found Asians to be less viscerally perceptive than European Americans. Study 4 examined one possible cultural mechanism for the observed difference and found evidence for contextual dependency as a mediator of the culture–visceral perception link.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-12-062012-02-062012-04-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/a0027010
PMID: 22309028
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 102 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 718 - 728 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-3514
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925416978