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  Peripheral and Central Inputs Shape Network Dynamics in the Developing Visual Cortex In Vivo

Siegel, F., Heimel, J. A., Peters, J., & Lohmann, C. (2012). Peripheral and Central Inputs Shape Network Dynamics in the Developing Visual Cortex In Vivo. CURRENT BIOLOGY, 22(3), 253-258. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2011.12.026.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-50C2-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-50C3-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Siegel, Friederike1, 2, Author              
Heimel, J. Alexander2, Author
Peters, Judith2, Author
Lohmann, Christian1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department: Cellular and Systems Neurobiology / Bonhoeffer, MPI of Neurobiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1113545              
2External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: SPONTANEOUS RETINAL ACTIVITY; LATERAL GENICULATE-NUCLEUS; NEURONAL-ACTIVITY; SOMATOSENSORY CORTEX; SPINDLE BURSTS; MICE LACKING; WAVES; MECHANISMS; PATTERNS; ORGANIZATIONBiochemistry & Molecular Biology; Cell Biology;
 Abstract: Spontaneous network activity constitutes a central theme during the development of neuronal circuitry [1, 2]. Before the onset of vision, retinal neurons generate waves of spontaneous activity that are relayed along the ascending visual pathway [3, 4] and shape activity patterns in these regions [5, 6]. The spatiotemporal nature of retinal waves is required to establish precise functional maps in higher visual areas, and their disruption results in enlarged axonal projection areas (e.g., [7-10]). However, how retinal inputs shape network dynamics in the visual cortex on the cellular level is unknown. Using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, we identified two independently occurring patterns of network activity in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) before and at the onset of vision. Acute manipulations of spontaneous retinal activity revealed that one type of network activity largely originated in the retina and was characterized by low synchronicity (L-) events. In addition, we identified a type of high synchronicity (H-) events that required gap junction signaling but were independent of retinal input. Moreover, the patterns differed in wave progression and developmental profile. Our data suggest that different activity patterns have complementary functions during the formation of synaptic circuits in the developing visual cortex.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-02-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 6
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000300070200026
DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2011.12.026
 Degree: -

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Title: CURRENT BIOLOGY
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: 600 TECHNOLOGY SQUARE, 5TH FLOOR, CAMBRIDGE, MA 02139 USA : CELL PRESS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 253 - 258 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822