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  Repetitive TMS suggests a role of the human dorsal premotor cortex in action prediction

Stadler, W., Ott, D. V. M., Springer, A., Schubotz, R. I., Schütz-Bosbach, S., & Prinz, W. (2012). Repetitive TMS suggests a role of the human dorsal premotor cortex in action prediction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6: 20. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2012.00020.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-8354-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-5CD2-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Stadler, Waltraud1, 2, Author              
Ott, Derek V. M.1, Author              
Springer, Anne1, 3, Author              
Schubotz, Ricarda I.4, Author              
Schütz-Bosbach, Simone5, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Movement Science Unit, Department of Sport and Health Science, TU Munich, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Sport and Exercise Psychology, University of Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Motor Cognition Group, Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Max Planck Research Group Body and Self, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634554              

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Free keywords: Action observation; Prediction; Occlusion; Premotor; PMd; Transcranial magnetic stimulation
 Abstract: Predicting the actions of other individuals is crucial for our daily interactions. Recent evidence suggests that the prediction of object-directed arm and full-body actions employs the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd). Thus, the neural substrate involved in action control may also be essential for action prediction. Here, we aimed to address this issue and hypothesized that disrupting the PMd impairs action prediction. Using fMRI-guided coil navigation, rTMS (five pulses, 10 Hz) was applied over the left PMd and over the vertex (control region) while participants observed everyday actions in video clips that were transiently occluded for 1 s. The participants detected manipulations in the time course of occluded actions, which required them to internally predict the actions during occlusion. To differentiate between functional roles that the PMd could play in prediction, rTMS was either delivered at occluder-onset (TMS-early), affecting the initiation of action prediction, or 300 ms later during occlusion (TMS-late), affecting the maintenance of an ongoing prediction. TMS-early over the left PMd produced more prediction errors than TMS-early over the vertex. TMS-late had no effect on prediction performance, suggesting that the left PMd might be involved particularly during the initiation of internally guided action prediction but may play a subordinate role in maintaining ongoing prediction. These findings open a new perspective on the role of the left PMd in action prediction which is in line with its functions in action control and in cognitive tasks. In the discussion, the relevance of the left PMd for integrating external action parameters with the observer’s motor repertoire is emphasized. Overall, the results are in line with the notion that premotor functions are employed in both action control and action observation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-08-252012-02-022012-02-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: PMC: 3282473
PMID: 22363279
DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2012.00020
Other: eCollection 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 20 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161