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  How to regulate emotion? Neural networks for reappraisal and distraction

Kanske, P., Heissler, J., Schönfelder, S., Bongers, A., & Wessa, M. (2011). How to regulate emotion? Neural networks for reappraisal and distraction. Cerebral Cortex, 21(6), 1379-1388. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhq216.

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 Creators:
Kanske, Philipp1, Author              
Heissler, Janine1, 2, Author
Schönfelder, Sandra1, Author
Bongers, André3, Author
Wessa, Michèle1, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Center for Doctoral Studies in Social and Behavioral Sciences, Graduate School of Economic and Social Sciences, University of Mannheim, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Mediri GmbH, Mannheim, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Affect: Amygdala; fMRI; Mental arithmetic; PPI
 Abstract: The regulation of emotion is vital for adaptive behavior in a social environment. Different strategies may be adopted to achieve successful emotion regulation, ranging from attentional control (e.g., distraction) to cognitive change (e.g., reappraisal). However, there is only scarce evidence comparing the different regulation strategies with respect to their neural mechanisms and their effects on emotional experience. We, therefore, directly compared reappraisal and distraction in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study with emotional pictures. In the distraction condition participants performed an arithmetic task, while they reinterpreted the emotional situation during reappraisal to downregulate emotional intensity. Both strategies were successful in reducing subjective emotional state ratings and lowered activity in the bilateral amygdala. Direct contrasts, however, showed a stronger decrease in amygdala activity for distraction when compared with reappraisal. While both strategies relied on common control areas in the medial and dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex was selectively activated for reappraisal. In contrast, the dorsal anterior cingulate and large clusters in the parietal cortex were active in the distraction condition. Functional connectivity patterns of the amygdala activation confirmed the roles of these specific activations for the 2 emotion regulation strategies.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2010-11-012011-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhq216
 Degree: -

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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 21 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1379 - 1388 Identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925592440