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  A native plant growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus megaterium B55, rescues growth performance of an ethylene insensitive plant genotype in nature

Meldau, D. G., Long, H. H., & Baldwin, I. T. (2012). A native plant growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus megaterium B55, rescues growth performance of an ethylene insensitive plant genotype in nature. Frontiers in Plant Science, 3: 112. doi:10.3389/fpls.2012.00112.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2012.00112 (Publisher version)
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Meldau, Dorothea G.1, Author              
Long, Hoa Hoang1, Author              
Baldwin, Ian Thomas1, Author              
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1Department of Molecular Ecology, Prof. I. T. Baldwin, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_24029              

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 Abstract: Many plants have intimate relationships with soil microbes, which improve the plant’s growth and fitness through a variety of mechanisms. Bacillus sp. isolates are natural root-associated bacteria, isolated from Nicotiana attenuata plant roots growing in native soils. A particular isolate B55, was found to have dramatic plant growth promotion (PGP) effects on wild type (WT) and transgenic plants impaired in ethylene (ET) perception (35S-etr1), the genotype from which this bacterium was first isolated. B55 not only improves N. attenuata growth under in vitro, glasshouse, and field conditions, but it also “rescues” many of the deleterious phenotypes associated with ET insensitivity. Most notably, B55 dramatically increases the growth and survival of 35S-etr1 plants under field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a PGP effect in a native plant–microbe association under natural conditions. Our study demonstrates that this facultative mutualistic plant–microbe interaction should be viewed as part of the plant’s extended phenotype. Possible modalities of recruitment and mechanisms of PGP are discussed.

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 Dates: 20122012-06-112012
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: Other: ITB372
DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2012.00112
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Title: Frontiers in Plant Science
  Abbreviation : Front. Plant Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne : Frontiers Media
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 Sequence Number: 112 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-462X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664462X