English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Circadian desynchrony promotes metabolic disruption in a mouse model of shiftwork.

Barclay, J. L., Husse, J. L., Bode, B., Naujokat, N., Meyer-Kovac, J., Schmid, S. M., et al. (2012). Circadian desynchrony promotes metabolic disruption in a mouse model of shiftwork. PLoS One, 7(5): e37150. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037150.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-9DC7-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-CAD4-9
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
1478340.pdf (Publisher version), 4MB
Name:
1478340.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Barclay, J. L.1, Author              
Husse, J. L.2, Author              
Bode, B.1, Author              
Naujokat, N.1, Author              
Meyer-Kovac, J.1, Author              
Schmid, S. M., Author
Lehnert, H., Author
Oster, H.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Circadian Rhythms, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578594              
2Department of Genes and Behavior, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_persistent34              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Shiftwork is associated with adverse metabolic pathophysiology, and the rising incidence of shiftwork in modern societies is thought to contribute to the worldwide increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome. The underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, but may involve direct physiological effects of nocturnal light exposure, or indirect consequences of perturbed endogenous circadian clocks. This study employs a two-week paradigm in mice to model the early molecular and physiological effects of shiftwork. Two weeks of timed sleep restriction has moderate effects on diurnal activity patterns, feeding behavior, and clock gene regulation in the circadian pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In contrast, microarray analyses reveal global disruption of diurnal liver transcriptome rhythms, enriched for pathways involved in glucose and lipid metabolism and correlating with first indications of altered metabolism. Although altered food timing itself is not sufficient to provoke these effects, stabilizing peripheral clocks by timed food access can restore molecular rhythms and metabolic function under sleep restriction conditions. This study suggests that peripheral circadian desynchrony marks an early event in the metabolic disruption associated with chronic shiftwork. Thus, strengthening the peripheral circadian system by minimizing food intake during night shifts may counteract the adverse physiological consequences frequently observed in human shift workers.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-05-212012-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037150
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 (5) Sequence Number: e37150 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -