English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Host plant use by competing Acacia-ants: mutualists monopolize while parasites share hosts

Kautz, S., Ballhorn, D. J., Kroiß, J., Pauls, S. U., Moreau, C. S., Eilmus, S., et al. (2012). Host plant use by competing Acacia-ants: mutualists monopolize while parasites share hosts. PLoS One, 7(5): e37691. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0037691.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
KAL024.pdf (Publisher version), 431KB
Name:
KAL024.pdf
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-
:
KAL024s1.zip (Supplementary material), 539KB
Name:
KAL024s1.zip
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/zip / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0037691 (Publisher version)
Description:
OA
OA-Status:

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kautz, Stefanie, Author
Ballhorn, Daniel J., Author
Kroiß, Johannes1, Author           
Pauls, Steffen U., Author
Moreau, Corrie S., Author
Eilmus, Sascha, Author
Strohm, Erhard, Author
Heil, Martin, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Insect Symbiosis, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_421897              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Protective ant-plant mutualisms that are exploited by non-defending parasitic ants represent prominent model systems for ecology and evolutionary biology. The mutualist Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus is an obligate plant-ant and fully depends on acacias for nesting space and food. The parasite Pseudomyrmex gracilis facultatively nests on acacias and uses host-derived food rewards but also external food sources. Integrative analyses of genetic microsatellite data, cuticular hydrocarbons and behavioral assays showed that an individual acacia might be inhabited by the workers of several P. gracilis queens, whereas one P. ferrugineus colony monopolizes one or more host trees. Despite these differences in social organization, neither of the species exhibited aggressive behavior among conspecific workers sharing a tree regardless of their relatedness. This lack of aggression corresponds to the high similarity of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles among ants living on the same tree. Host sharing by unrelated colonies, or the presence of several queens in a single colony are discussed as strategies by which parasite colonies could achieve the observed social organization. We argue that in ecological terms, the non-aggressive behavior of non-sibling P. gracilis workers — regardless of the route to achieve this social structure — enables this species to efficiently occupy and exploit a host plant. By contrast, single large and long-lived colonies of the mutualist P. ferrugineus monopolize individual host plants and defend them aggressively against invaders from other trees. Our findings highlight the necessity for using several methods in combination to fully understand how differing life history strategies affect social organization in ants.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2012-04-272012-05-252012
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: Other: KAL024
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0037691
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 (5) Sequence Number: e37691 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850