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  Morphometric gray matter differences of the medial frontal cortex influence the social Simon effect

Dolk, T., Liepelt, R., Villringer, A., Prinz, W., & Ragert, P. (2012). Morphometric gray matter differences of the medial frontal cortex influence the social Simon effect. NeuroImage, 61(4), 1249-1254. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.061.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-A1BE-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B031-E
Genre: Journal Article

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Dolk_2012_Morphometric.pdf (Publisher version), 464KB
 
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 Creators:
Dolk, Thomas1, Author              
Liepelt, Roman2, Author              
Villringer, Arno3, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Ragert, Patrick3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Junior Group “Neurocognition of Joint Action”, Department of Psychology, Münster University, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              

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Free keywords: Social interaction; Social Simon effect; Inter-individual differences; Gray matter; Voxel-based morphometry
 Abstract: Interacting with others plays a fundamental role in human life. Although several brain regions have recently been associated with complex cognitive control processes, surprisingly little is known about the structural correlates underlying cognitive control processes involved in social interactions. In the present study we used gray matter voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate structural brain correlates of individual performance differences in a social Simon task. Here, two people share a Simon task, which requires each participant to respond to only one of two possible stimuli, rendering the paradigm a go-nogo task, so that a Simon effect – known as the Social Simon Effect (SSE) – is observable across both participants. Using a whole brain approach, we found that inter-individual differences in the SSE are negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of the medial frontal cortex (MFC). The present data indicate that individuals with larger MFC GM volume were those with better conflict resolution in a social Simon task and vice versa. This brain-behavior relationship between cognitive control processes and individual GM volume differences might help to improve our understanding of social interactions in joint task performance.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-03-202012-03-282012-07-16
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.061
PMID: 22484205
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 61 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1249 - 1254 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166