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  Bidirectional gray matter changes after complex motor skill learning

Gryga, M., Taubert, M., Dukart, J., Vollmann, H., Conde, V., Sehm, B., et al. (2012). Bidirectional gray matter changes after complex motor skill learning. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 6: 37. doi:10.3389/fnsys.2012.00037.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-A887-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-5C2A-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Gryga, Martin, Author
Taubert, Marco1, Author              
Dukart, Jürgen1, Author              
Vollmann, Henning1, Author              
Conde, Virginia1, Author              
Sehm, Bernhard1, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, Author              
Ragert, Patrick1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              

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Free keywords: motor learning, primary motor cortex (M1), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), premotor cortex (PMC), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
 Abstract: Long-term motor skill learning has been consistently shown to result in functional as well as structural changes in the adult human brain. However, the effect of short learning periods on brain structure is not well understood. In the present study, subjects performed a sequential pinch force task (SPFT) for 20 min on 5 consecutive days. Changes in brain structure were evaluated with anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans acquired on the first and last day of motor skill learning. Behaviorally, the SPFT resulted in sequence-specific learning with the trained (right) hand. Structural gray matter (GM) alterations in left M1, right ventral premotor cortex (PMC) and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) correlated with performance improvements in the SPFT. More specifically we found that subjects with strong sequence-specific performance improvements in the SPFT also had larger increases in GM volume in the respective brain areas. On the other hand, subjects with small behavioral gains either showed no change or even a decrease in GM volume during the time course of learning. Furthermore, cerebellar GM volume before motor skill learning predicted (A) individual learning-related changes in the SPFT and (B) the amount of structural changes in left M1, right ventral PMC and DLPFC. In summary, we provide novel evidence that short-term motor skill learning is associated with learning-related structural brain alterations. Additionally, we showed that practicing a motor skill is not exclusively accompanied by increased GM volume. Instead, bidirectional structural alterations explained the variability of the individual learning success.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-05-16
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnsys.2012.00037
PMID: 22623914
PMC: PMC3353266
Other: eCollection 2012
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Syst Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 37 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5137
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5137