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  Auditory skills and brain morphology predict individual differences in adaptation to degraded speech

Erb, J., Henry, M., Eisner, F., & Obleser, J. (2012). Auditory skills and brain morphology predict individual differences in adaptation to degraded speech. Neuropsychologia, 50(9), 2154-2164. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2012.05.013.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-A9D0-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-5C1C-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Erb, Julia1, Author              
Henry, Molly1, Author              
Eisner, Frank2, Author
Obleser, Jonas1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_751545              
2Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Language; Noise-vocoded speech; Cochlear implant simulation; Perceptual learning; Amplitude modulation rate; Voxel-based morphometry
 Abstract: Noise-vocoded speech is a spectrally highly degraded signal, but it preserves the temporal envelope of speech. Listeners vary considerably in their ability to adapt to this degraded speech signal. Here, we hypothesised that individual differences in adaptation to vocoded speech should be predictable by non-speech auditory, cognitive, and neuroanatomical factors. We tested eighteen normal-hearing participants in a short-term vocoded speech-learning paradigm (listening to 100 4-band-vocoded sentences). Non-speech auditory skills were assessed using amplitude modulation (AM) rate discrimination, where modulation rates were centered on the speech-relevant rate of 4 Hz. Working memory capacities were evaluated (digit span and nonword repetition), and structural MRI scans were examined for anatomical predictors of vocoded speech learning using voxel-based morphometry. Listeners who learned faster to understand degraded speech also showed smaller thresholds in the AM discrimination task. This ability to adjust to degraded speech is furthermore reflected anatomically in increased volume in an area of the left thalamus (pulvinar) that is strongly connected to the auditory and prefrontal cortices. Thus, individual non-speech auditory skills and left thalamus grey matter volume can predict how quickly a listener adapts to degraded speech.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-01-162012-05-102012-06-152012-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2012.05.013
PMID: 22609577
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: Neuropsychologia
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 50 (9) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2154 - 2164 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-3932
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925428258