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  Intensity-dependent host mortality: what can it tell us about larval growth strategies in complex life cycle helminths?

Benesh, D. P. (2011). Intensity-dependent host mortality: what can it tell us about larval growth strategies in complex life cycle helminths? Parasitology, 138(7), 913-925. doi:10.1017/S0031182011000370.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D3BA-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D3BB-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Benesh, D. P.1, Author              
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1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: crowding effect; growth cost; life history strategy; Macrocyclops albidus; Nematoda; resource constraint; virulence
 Abstract: Complex life cycle helminths use their intermediate hosts as both a source of nutrients and as transportation. There is an assumed trade-off between these functions in that parasite growth may reduce host survival and thus transmission. The virulence of larval helminths can be assessed by experimentally increasing infection intensities and recording how parasite biomass and host mortality scale with intensity. I summarize the literature on these relationships in larval helminths and I provide an empirical example using the nematode Camallanus lacustris in its copepod first host. In all species studied thus far, including C. lacustris, overall parasite volume increases with intensity. Although a few studies observed host survival to decrease predictably with intensity, several studies found no intensity-dependent mortality or elevated mortality only at extreme intensities. For instance, no intensity-dependent mortality was observed in male copepods infected with C. lacustris, whereas female survival was reduced only at high intensities (>3) and only after worms were fully developed. These observations suggest that at low, natural intensity levels parasites do not exploit intermediate hosts as much as they presumably could and that increased growth would not obviously entail survival costs.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 564934
DOI: 10.1017/S0031182011000370
Other: 2837/S 39180
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Title: Parasitology
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 138 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 913 - 925 Identifier: ISSN: 0031-1820 (print)
ISSN: 1469-8161 (online)