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  Sex allocation and mate choice of selfed and outcrossed Schistocephalus solidus (Cestoda)

Schjørring, S. (2009). Sex allocation and mate choice of selfed and outcrossed Schistocephalus solidus (Cestoda). Behavioral Ecology, 20(3), 644-650. doi:10.1093/beheco/arp046.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D5AA-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D5AB-9
Genre: Journal Article

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Schjoerring_2009.pdf (Publisher version), 101KB
 
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 Creators:
Schjørring, Solveig1, Author              
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1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: inbreeding depression; mating system; parasite; selfing; sex allocation; simultaneous hermaphrodite; tapeworm
 Abstract: Animals that inbreed regularly under natural conditions may provide valuable information about the evolutionary response of mate choice to an increase in a population's rate of inbreeding. I studied how an individual's inbreeding status affects its criteria of mate choice, as well as its own attractiveness, in a parasite, the hermaphroditic cestode Schistocephalus solidus, which inbreeds under natural conditions. Specifically, I tested whether a cestode's inbreeding status and allocation to reproductive tissue affect its attractiveness to selfed and outcrossed individuals. In a simultaneous choice situation, outcrossed cestodes strongly preferred an outcrossed mating partner over a selfed one, whereas selfed cestodes showed no preference with respect to the partner's inbreeding status. Both selfed and outcrossed cestodes were attracted to partners with a large combined amount of male and female reproductive tissue and with the potential to produce large eggs. I discuss how assortative mating with respect to inbreeding status may have consequences for the maintenance of a genetic load in the population as well as for the maintenance of selfing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2009-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 430628
DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arp046
Other: 2698/S 38999
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Title: Behavioral Ecology
  Alternative Title : Behav Ecol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 20 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 644 - 650 Identifier: ISSN: 1045-2249 (print)
ISSN: 1465-7279 (online)