English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Differences in parasite susceptibility and costs of resistance between naturally exposed and unexposed host populations

Hasu, T., Benesh, D. P., & Valtonen, E. T. (2009). Differences in parasite susceptibility and costs of resistance between naturally exposed and unexposed host populations. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 22(4), 699-707. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01704.x.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D5CA-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D5CB-1
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Hasu, T., et al. 2009, S 38982.pdf (Publisher version), 170KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Hasu, T., et al. 2009, S 38982.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Hasu, T., Author
Benesh, D. P.1, Author              
Valtonen, E. T., Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Acanthocephala; Acanthocephalus lucii; evolution of resistance; host-parasite interaction; local adaptation; naive host; parasite-mediated selection
 Abstract: It is generally assumed that resistance to parasitism entails costs. Consequently, hosts evolving in the absence of parasites are predicted to invest less in costly resistance mechanisms than hosts consistently exposed to parasites. This prediction has, however, rarely been tested in natural populations. We studied the susceptibility of three naive, three parasitized and one recently isolated Asellus aquaticus isopod populations to an acanthocephalan parasite. We found that parasitized populations, with the exception of the isopod population sympatric with the parasite strain used, were less susceptible to the parasite than the naive populations. Exposed but uninfected (resistant) isopods from naive populations, but not from parasitized populations, exhibited greater mortality than controls, implying that resistance entails survival costs primarily for naive isopods. These results suggest that parasites can drive the evolution of host resistance in the wild, and that co-existence with parasites may increase the cost-effectiveness of defence mechanisms.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2009-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 429341
DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01704.x
Other: 2686/S 38982
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
  Alternative Title : J. Evol. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 22 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 699 - 707 Identifier: ISSN: 1010-061X (print)
ISSN: 1420-9101 (online)