English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Host manipulation by parasites in the world of dead-end predators: adaptation to enhance transmission?

Seppälä, O., Valtonen, E. T., & Benesh, D. P. (2008). Host manipulation by parasites in the world of dead-end predators: adaptation to enhance transmission? Proceedings of the Royal Society B - Biological Sciences, 275(1643), 1611-1615. doi:10.1098/rspb.2008.0152.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D689-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D68A-B
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Seppaelae_2008.pdf (Publisher version), 134KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Seppaelae_2008.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Seppälä, Otto, Author
Valtonen, E. Tellervo, Author
Benesh, Daniel P.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: parasite-host interactions; host phenotype; non-host predation; Acanthocephala; Acanthocephalus lucii; Asellus aquaticus
 Abstract: Trophically transmitted parasites often alter their intermediate host's phenotype, thereby predisposing the hosts to increased predation. This is generally considered a parasite strategy evolved to enhance transmission to the next hosts. However, the adaptive value of host manipulation is not clear as it may be associated with costs, such as increased susceptibility to predators that are unsuitable next hosts for the parasites. We examined the ratio between the benefits and costs of host manipulation for transmission success of Acanthocephalus lucii (Acanthocephala), a parasite that alters the hiding behaviour and pigmentation of its isopod hosts. We experimentally compared the susceptibility of infected and uninfected isopods to predation by perch (Perca fluvialis; definitive host of the parasite) and dragonfly larvae (dead end). We found that the parasite predisposed the isopods to predation by both predators. However, the increased predation vulnerability of the infected isopods was higher towards perch. This suggests that, despite the costs due to non-host predation, host manipulation may still be advantageous for the parasite.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2008-07-22
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 367975
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.0152
Other: 2625/S 38804
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society B - Biological Sciences
  Alternative Title : Proc. R. Soc. B
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 275 (1643) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1611 - 1615 Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8452