English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Competition may determine the diversity of transposable elements

Abrusán, G., & Krambeck, H.-J. (2006). Competition may determine the diversity of transposable elements. Theoretical Population Biology, 70(3), 364-375. doi:10.1016/j.tpb.2006.05.001.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D831-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D832-0
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
abrusan2_2006.pdf (Publisher version), 688KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
abrusan2_2006.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Abrusán, György1, Author              
Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_976547              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: molecular parasite; transposon community; comparative genomics; evenness
 Abstract: Transposable elements are genomic parasites that replicate independently from their hosts. They harm their hosts by causing mutations or genomic rearrangements, and most organisms have evolved various mechanisms to suppress their activity. The evolutionary dynamics of transposons in insects, fish, birds and mammals are dramatically different. Mammalian genomes contain few, very abundant but relatively inactive transposon strains, while Drosophila and fish species harbour diverse strains, which typically have low abundance but are much more virulent. We hypothesise that the variation in the diversity and activity of transposable elements between various animal genomes is caused by the differences in the host defence mechanisms against transposon activity. In recent years RNAi, a mechanism capable of gene, virus and transposon silencing has been discovered. We model RNAi as a density dependant mechanism of defence, which can cause competition among transposons depending on its specificity, and test its predictions using the complete Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Fugu rubripes, chicken, mouse, rat and human genome sequences.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 291408
DOI: 10.1016/j.tpb.2006.05.001
Other: 2509/S 38586
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Theoretical Population Biology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 70 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 364 - 375 Identifier: ISSN: 0040-5809