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  Snail odour-clouds: spreading and contribution to the transmission success of Trichobilharzia ocellata (Trematoda, Digenea) miracidia

Hertel, J., Holweg, A., Haberl, B., Kalbe, M., & Haas, W. (2006). Snail odour-clouds: spreading and contribution to the transmission success of Trichobilharzia ocellata (Trematoda, Digenea) miracidia. Oecologia, 147(1), 173-180. doi:10.1007/s00442-005-0239-5.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D8E3-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D8E4-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Hertel, Jan, Author
Holweg, Alexander, Author
Haberl, Bernhard, Author
Kalbe, Martin1, 2, Author              
Haas, Wilfried, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              
2Research Group Parasitology, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445643              

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Free keywords: behavioural ecology; chemical ecology; host-finding; Lymnaea; microhabitat selection
 Abstract: Chemical communication among freshwater organisms is an adaptation to improve their coexistence. Here,we focus on the chemical cues secreted by the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis, which are known to stimulate behavioural responses of Trichobilharzia ocellata (Plathelminthes, Digenea, Trematoda) miracidia. Such responses are commonly claimed to influence transmission positively, but in response to chemical cues miracidia randomly change their swimming direction. This kind of response does not necessarily increase transmission, because miracidia may be trapped at the periphery of very large snail odour-clouds, which may prevent them from approaching the snail. On the other hand, the odour clouds may be too small to improve host-localisation. To shed light on these scenarios, the spreading of molecules released around L. stagnalis (active space) was visualised by recording host-finding responses of T. ocellata miracidia when they approached snails. Behavioural responses of miracidia indicated the spreading of compounds forming an attractive active space only around the host-snail L. stagnalis, but not around sympatric non-host-snail species. The active space increased approximately linearly with the time the snail rested at the same spot and within 5 min it reached a volume of more than 30 times that of the snail. We also demonstrated in a large-scale experiment, that the active space of L. stagnalis significantly increases the transmission success of T. ocellata miracidia. Additionally, the microhabitat selection of T. ocellata miracidia was studied, demonstrating that peripheral locations near the water surface were preferred, which are also preferred sites of L. stagnalis. Improved chemoperception and microhabitat selection may have been a consequence of coevolution with snails and benefited miracidia, which became efficient transmissive stages.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 256555
DOI: 10.1007/s00442-005-0239-5
Other: 2446/S 38456
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Title: Oecologia
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 147 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 173 - 180 Identifier: ISSN: 0029-8549