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  Multiple infections: relatedness and time between infections affect the establishment and growth of the cestode Schistocephalus solidus in its stickleback host

Jäger, I., & Schjørring, S. (2006). Multiple infections: relatedness and time between infections affect the establishment and growth of the cestode Schistocephalus solidus in its stickleback host. Evolution, 60(3), 616-622.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D901-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D902-3
Genre: Journal Article

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jaeger_2006.pdf (Publisher version), 226KB
 
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 Creators:
Jäger, Ilonka1, Author              
Schjørring, Solveig1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: Gasterosteus aculeatus; multiple infection; parasite transmission; relatedness of parasites; Schistocephalus solidus; simultaneous and sequential infection; within-host dynamics
 Abstract: We studied experimental double infections of the cestode Schistocephalus solidus in its stickleback host. In particular, we were interested in how two important components of the cestode’s transmission success—establishment and growth within the fish host—were affected by the relatedness of the two parasites in a double exposure and by the timing of the two exposures, that is, whether they occurred simultaneously or sequentially. We found that male sticklebacks more often became infected (singly or doubly) if the two cestodes in the exposures were related, whereas female sticklebacks were more easily infected (singly or doubly) when exposed to two unrelated cestodes. Irrespective of the fish’s gender, successful infections more often contained both cestodes when they were related. In sequential exposures with related as well as unrelated cestodes, the cestode in the later exposure survived better and also grew larger than the cestode from the first exposure, despite being one week younger. Our results emphasize that withinhost dynamics and factors acting at this level can play an important role in determining a parasite’s transmission success.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: eDoc: 261757
Other: 2457/S 38467
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Title: Evolution
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 60 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 616 - 622 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820