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  How a complex life cycle can improve a parasite's sex life

Rauch, G., Kalbe, M., & Reusch, T. B. H. (2005). How a complex life cycle can improve a parasite's sex life. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 18(4), 1069-1075. doi:10.1111/j.1420-9101.2005.00895.x.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D9AE-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D9AF-0
Genre: Journal Article

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rauch_2005.pdf (Publisher version), 174KB
 
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 Creators:
Rauch, G.1, Author              
Kalbe, M.1, 2, Author              
Reusch, T. B. H.1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              
2Research Group Parasitology, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445643              
3Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_976547              

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Free keywords: complex life cycles; Diplostomum pseudospathaceum; microsatellites; parasite clonal diversity
 Abstract: How complex life cycles of parasites are maintained is still a fascinating and unresolved topic. Complex life cycles using three host species, free-living stages, asexual and sexual reproduction are widespread in parasitic helminths. For such life cycles, we propose here that maintaining a second intermediate host in the life cycle can be advantageous for the individual parasite to increase the intermixture of different clones and therefore decrease the risk of matings between genetically identical individuals in the definitive host. Using microsatellite markers, we show that clone mixing occurs from the first to the second intermediate host in natural populations of the eye-fluke Diplostomum pseudospathaceum. Most individuals released by the first intermediate host belonged to one clone. In contrast, the second intermediate host was infected with a diverse array of mostly unique parasite genotypes. The proposed advantage of increased parasite clone intermixture may be a novel selection pressure favouring the maintenance of complex life cycles.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2005-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 233808
DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2005.00895.x
Other: 2367/S 38389
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Title: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
  Alternative Title : J. evol. biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 18 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1069 - 1075 Identifier: ISSN: 1010-061X