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  Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity

Reusch, T. B. H., Ehlers, A., Hämmerli, A., & Worm, B. (2005). Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(8), 2826-2831. doi:10.1073/pnas.0500008102.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D9EF-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-D9F0-B
Genre: Journal Article

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reusch_2005.pdf (Publisher version), 358KB
 
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 Creators:
Reusch, Thorsten B. H.1, 2, Author              
Ehlers, Anneli1, Author              
Hämmerli, August1, Author              
Worm, Boris, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_976547              
2Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: global change; ecosystem functioning; ecological resilience; seagrass
 Abstract: Contemporary climate change is characterized both by increasing mean temperature and increasing climate variability such as heat waves, storms, and floods. How populations and communities cope with such climatic extremes is a question central to contemporary ecology and biodiversity conservation. Previous work has shown that species diversity can affect ecosystem functioning and resilience. Here, we show that genotypic diversity can replace the role of species diversity in a species-poor coastal ecosystem, and it may buffer against extreme climatic events. In a manipulative field experiment, increasing the genotypic diversity of the cosmopolitan seagrass Zostera marina enhanced biomass production, plant density, and faunal abundance, despite near-lethal water temperatures due to extreme warming across Europe. Net biodiversity effects were explained by genotypic complementarity rather than by selection of particularly robust genotypes. Positive effects on invertebrate fauna suggest that genetic diversity has second-order effects reaching higher trophic levels. Our results highlight the importance of maintaining genetic as well as species diversity to enhance ecosystem resilience in a world of increasing uncertainty.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2005-02-22
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 217952
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0500008102
Other: 2380/S 38358
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Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Alternative Title : PNAS
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 102 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2826 - 2831 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424