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  Simultaneous hermaphrodites reproducing in pairs self-fertilize some of their eggs: an experimental test of predictions of mixed-mating and Hermaphrodite's Dilemma theory

Lüscher, A., & Milinski, M. (2003). Simultaneous hermaphrodites reproducing in pairs self-fertilize some of their eggs: an experimental test of predictions of mixed-mating and Hermaphrodite's Dilemma theory. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 16(5), 1030-1037.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DBBA-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DBBB-6
Genre: Journal Article

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Luescher_2003.pdf (Publisher version), 154KB
 
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Lüscher, A.1, Author              
Milinski, M.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: cross-fertilization; Hermaphrodite's Dilemma; microsatellite; mixed-mating system; reproductive conflict; Schistocephalus solidus; self-fertilization; simultaneous hermaphrodite
 Abstract: Theory predicts (1) that mixed-mating systems (i.e. reproduction through both selfing and outcrossing) should usually not evolve and (2) that reproducing simultaneous hermaphrodites should be in a conflict over the preferred sexual role (The Hermaphrodite's Dilemma). In an in vitro system with the endoparasitic cestode Schistocephalus solidus, a simultaneous hermaphrodite, we tested predictions of both the mixed-mating and the Hermaphrodite's Dilemma theory. Using microsatellite markers, we measured the proportion of selfed offspring and the total reproductive output of each worm within pairs varying in mean weight and weight difference. Worms produced more outbred offspring not only with increasing total weight of the pair, but also with decreasing weight difference between the two paired worms. These results suggest: (1) that this parasite species reproduces by mixed-mating, which may be maintained by stochastic density fluctuations in the definitive host and hence unpredictability of self reproduction and (2) reproductive conflict may prevent worm pairs from achieving an optimal intermediate selfing rate.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2003-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 49851
Other: 2232/S 37989
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Title: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
  Alternative Title : J. EVOL. BIOL.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1030 - 1037 Identifier: ISSN: 1010-061X