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  On the cost of vertical migration: are feeding conditions really worse at greater depths?

Winder, M., Boersma, M., & Spaak, P. (2003). On the cost of vertical migration: are feeding conditions really worse at greater depths? Freshwater Biology, 48(3), 383-393.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DC08-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DC09-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Winder, M.1, Author              
Boersma, M.1, Author              
Spaak, P.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_976547              

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Free keywords: Daphnia; food quality; growth rate; high-mountain lake; vertical migration
 Abstract: 1. The ultimate explanation for diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton is the avoidance of visual predation in surface waters. Studies on migrating zooplankton have shown that remaining in the cold and food-poor hypolimnion during the day, however, has demographic costs. Higher temperatures and greater food concentrations in the surface waters are thought to be the main reasons why Daphnia species move upwards at night. 2. In this study, we investigated the growth condition of daphniids raised on seston taken from different depths from a lake with and without a deep-water chlorophyll maximum. 3. Juvenile growth rates of Daphnia galeata x hyalina from the lake without a deep-water chlorophyll maximum were similar for all treatments. After temperature correction, however, growth rates were significantly higher on seston taken from the surface layers. 4. In contrast, in the lake with the deep-water chlorophyll maximum, D. galeata growth rates were higher in deeper strata, even after temperature correction. Although this lake had a weak temperature gradient, D. galeata left the food- rich strata at night and migrated into the surface food-poor environment. Invertebrate predation and oxygen depletion are probably not the reasons for the nocturnal upward migration into the surface strata. Therefore, we assume that D. galeata migrates upwards to take advantage of higher temperatures. Using several temperature-egg-development models, we could not, however, fully explain this behaviour.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2003-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 39095
ISI: 000181027400001
Other: 2214/S 37948
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Title: Freshwater Biology
  Alternative Title : Freshw. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 48 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 383 - 393 Identifier: ISSN: 0046-5070