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  Multiple parasites are driving major histocompatibility complex polymorphism in the wild

Wegner, K. M., Reusch, T. B. H., & Kalbe, M. (2003). Multiple parasites are driving major histocompatibility complex polymorphism in the wild. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 16(2), 224-232.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DC0B-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DC0C-2
Genre: Journal Article

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wegner_2003.pdf (Publisher version), 251KB
 
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 Creators:
Wegner, K. M.1, Author              
Reusch, T. B. H.1, 2, Author              
Kalbe, M.1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              
2Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_976547              
3Research Group Parasitology, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445643              

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Free keywords: balancing selection; major histocompatibility complex (MHC); multiple infections; parasite induced selection; polymorphism; three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)
 Abstract: Parasite mediated selection may result in arms races between host defence and parasite virulence. In particular, simultaneous infections from multiple parasite species should cause diversification (i.e. balancing selection) in resistance genes both at the population and the individual level. Here, we tested these ideas in highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes from three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.). In eight natural populations, parasite diversity (15 different species), and MHC class IIB diversity varied strongly between habitat types (lakes vs. rivers vs. estuaries) with lowest values in rivers. Partial correlation analysis revealed an influence of parasite diversity on MHC class IIB variation whereas general genetic diversity assessed at seven microsatellite loci was not significantly correlated with parasite diversity. Within individual fish, intermediate, rather than maximal allele numbers were associated with minimal parasite load, supporting theoretical models of self-reactive T-cell elimination. The optimal individual diversity matched those values female fish try to achieve in their offspring by mate choice. We thus present correlative evidence supporting the 'allele counting' strategy for optimizing the immunocompetence in stickleback offspring.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2003-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 39096
ISI: 000180926300006
Other: 2215/S 37949
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Title: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
  Alternative Title : J. Evol. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 224 - 232 Identifier: ISSN: 1010-061X