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  Reproductive decisions of the hermaphroditic tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus

Lüscher, A. (2002). Reproductive decisions of the hermaphroditic tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus. PhD Thesis, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DCA6-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-8441-1
Genre: Thesis

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 Creators:
Lüscher, Annelis1, Author              
Milinski, Manfred1, Advisor              
Brendelberger, H., Referee              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: Schistocephalus solidus; cross-fertilization; hermaphrodite; sexual conflict; mixed-mating; self-fertilization
 Abstract: In this thesis the reproductive decisions of S. solidus in the context of mating system evolution, genetic variability and gamete exchange was studied. Microsatellite markers were used to determine if progeny had been reproduced by self- or cross-fertilization. S. solidus individuals reproduce through both selfing and outcrossing even when mating in pairs (i.e. mixed-mating). The usually low densities in their final host force worms sometimes to self-fertilize as last resort. Selfed offspring of worm lineages which have always selfed a certain proportion of their eggs (despite the availability of a partner), may produce fitter progeny than do offspring from worms that have always outcrossed when both have to self in a year of low worm density. The investment in selfing and outcrossing was influenced by mating partner size as well as by partner heterozygosity. Moreover, worms adaptively adjusted their outcrossing rate depending on whether their selfed progeny had a high or a low fitness in terms of hatching rate. This gives them a selective advantage compared to individuals that would outcross and self at random. Genetic variability in a natural population of S. solidus shows a heterozygote deficiency which is in line with the mode of reproduction found in the lab namely mixed-mating. The S. solidus system is to date one of the best established model systems to study mixed-mating in animals in the lab as well as in the field.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2002-12-13
 Publication Status: Accepted / In Press
 Pages: 115 p.
 Publishing info: Kiel : Christian-Albrechts-Universität
 Table of Contents: Summary     7
Zusammenfassung   9
Introduction    
1 We are living in a "Wormy world"   13
2 Some basics about hermaphrodites   17
3 Distinguishing selfed and outcrossed offspring using microsatellites   19
4 Thesis outline   23
Chapters    
I Simultaneous hermaphrodites reproducing in pairs self-fertilize some of their eggs: an experimental test of predictions of mixed-mating and Hermaphrodite's Dilemma theory.   29
II Potential fitness from selfing and heterozygosity of mating partner determine outcrossing rate in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.   47
III Comparative genetic variability in a natural vertebrate-endoparasite system.   69
IV Schistocephalus solidus: A molecular test of premature gamete exchange in the intermediate host Gasterosteus aculeatus.   81
V Hermaphroditic endoparasites, the ideal model organisms for the investigation of mating system evolution.
   89
Conclusion     97
Danksagung     101
References     103
Curriculum     113
Erklärung     115
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 9957
URI: http://e-diss.uni-kiel.de/diss_661/
 Degree: PhD

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