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  Donors to charity gain in both indirect reciprocity and political reputation

Milinski, M., Semmann, D., & Krambeck, H.-J. (2002). Donors to charity gain in both indirect reciprocity and political reputation. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences, 269(1494), 881-883. doi:10.1098/rspb.2002.1964.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DD42-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-DD43-B
Genre: Journal Article

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milinski_2002.pdf (Publisher version), 228KB
 
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 Creators:
Milinski, Manfred1, Author              
Semmann, Dirk1, Author              
Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              
2Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_976547              

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Free keywords: evolution; charity; indirect reciprocity
 Abstract: Darwinian evolution can explain human cooperative behaviour among non-kin by either direct or indirect reciprocity. In the latter case one does not expect a return for an altruistic act from the recipient as with direct reciprocity, but from another member of the social group. However, the widespread human behaviour of donating to poor people outside the social group, for example, to charity organizations, that are unlikely to reciprocate indirectly and thus are equivalent to defectors in the game is still an evolutionary puzzle. Here we show experimentally that donations made in public to a well-known relief organization resulted both in increased income (that the donors received from the members of their group) and in enhanced political reputation (they were elected to represent the interests of their group). Donations may thus function as an honest signal for one''s social reliability.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2002-05-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 3956
ISI: 000175540100002
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2002.1964
Other: 2118/S 37830
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Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences
  Alternative Title : Proc. R. Soc. Lond. Ser. B-Biol. Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 269 (1494) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 881 - 883 Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8452