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  Effects of predation risk on diurnal mass dynamics and foraging routines of yellowhammers (Emberiza citrinella).

van der Veen, I. T. (1999). Effects of predation risk on diurnal mass dynamics and foraging routines of yellowhammers (Emberiza citrinella). Behavioral Ecology, 10(5), 545-551.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E07C-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E07D-3
Genre: Journal Article

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van der Veen_1999.pdf (Publisher version), 196KB
 
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van der Veen, Ineke T.1, Author              
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1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: body mass; daily routines; Emberiza citrinella; exposure time; intake rate; starvation-predation trade-off; yellowhammers
 Abstract: Theoretical models predict that when having fat reserves is costly in terms of predation risk, birds should decrease their levels of fat reserves in response to increased predation risk. I performed an experiment in which yellowhammers were exposed to a control treatment, where a curtain was moved several times a day, 5 days in a row, and then to a predator treatment, where a perched, stuffed sparrowhawk appeared when the curtain was moved, 5 days in a row Between the two treatments were 2 days without any experimental treatment. The birds were expected to decrease in mass, and/or to change the daily trajectory of mass increase in response to increased predation risk. Yellowhammers decreased in morning mass and evening mass in response to both che moving curtain and the sparrowhawk compared to an untreated day before the start of the experiment. However, the response to both treatments was not the same; in the sparrowhawk treatment the birds waited longer before resuming feeding and lost more weight after each exposure as compared to the curtain treatment. This loss was regained, and yellowhammers increased their intake rate. Due to that, they reduced, although not significantly, the time spent feeding under predation risk. A reduction in the time spent feeding under predation risk reduces the time exposed to predators. However, if an increase in intake rate also incurs a decrease in vigilance, this might increase predation risk. The results of this study, together with other studies, indicate that for yellowhammers a reduction in time exposed to predators might be more important for survival than a reduction in body mass.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 1999-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: eDoc: 119829
Other: 1819/S 37464
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Title: Behavioral Ecology
  Alternative Title : Behav Ecol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 545 - 551 Identifier: ISSN: 1045-2249