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  Movement kinematics affect action prediction: Comparing human to non-human point-light actions

Stadler, W., Springer, A., Parkinson, J., & Prinz, W. (2012). Movement kinematics affect action prediction: Comparing human to non-human point-light actions. Psychological Research, 76(4), 395-406. doi:10.1007/s00426-012-0431-2.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E80F-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-CC53-A
Genre: Journal Article

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Stadler_2012_Movement.pdf (Publisher version), 515KB
 
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 Creators:
Stadler, Waltraud1, 2, Author              
Springer, Anne1, 3, Author              
Parkinson, Jim4, 5, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Department of Sport and Health Science, TU Munich, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Sport and Exercise Psychology, University of Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
5Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: The influence of movement kinematics on the accuracy of predicting the time course of another individual’s actions was studied. A human point-light shape was animated with human movement (natural condition) and with artificial movement that was more uniform regarding velocity profiles and trajectories (artificial condition). During brief occlusions, the participants predicted the actions in order to judge after occlusion whether the actions were continued coherently in time or shifted to an earlier or later frame. Error rates and reaction times were increased in the artificial compared to the natural condition. The findings suggest a perceptual advantage for movement with a human velocity profile, corresponding to the notion of a close interaction between observed and executed movement. The results are discussed in the framework of the simulation account and alternative interpretations are provided on the basis of correlations between the velocity profiles of natural and artificial movements with prediction performance.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-02-292012-03-132012-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00426-012-0431-2
PMID: 22411563
Other: Epub 2012
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Title: Psychological Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 76 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 395 - 406 Identifier: ISSN: 0340-0727
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925518603_1