English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Function and composition of male accessory gland secretions in Anopheles gambiae: a comparison with other insect vectors of infectious diseases

Baldini, F., Gabrieli, P., Rogers, D. W., & Catteruccia, F. (2012). Function and composition of male accessory gland secretions in Anopheles gambiae: a comparison with other insect vectors of infectious diseases. Pathogens and Global Health, 106(2), 82-93. doi:10.1179/2047773212Y.0000000016.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-EB63-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-3AAB-C
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Baldini.pdf (Publisher version), 340KB
Name:
Baldini.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Baldini, Francesco, Author
Gabrieli, Paolo, Author
Rogers, David W.1, Author              
Catteruccia, Flaminia, Author
Affiliations:
1Max-Planck Research Group Experimental Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445640              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Anopheles; fertility; seminal fluid; sperm; post-mating response; vector control; Malaria; protease; redox; acps; copulation; reproduction; sex; sterile
 Abstract: Human malaria, a major public health burden in tropical and subtropical countries, is transmitted exclusively by the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito. Malaria control strategies aimed at inducing sexual sterility in natural vector populations are an attractive alternative to the use of insecticides. However, despite their importance as disease vectors, limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms regulating fertility in Anopheles mosquitoes. In the major malaria vector, An. gambiae, the full complement of sperm and seminal fluid required for a female’s lifelong egg production is obtained from a single mating event. This single mating has important consequences for the physiology and behavior of An. gambiae females: in particular, they become refractory to further insemination, and they start laying eggs. In other insects including Drosophila, similar post-copulatory changes are induced by seminal proteins secreted by the male accessory glands and transferred to the female during mating. In this review, we analyze the current state of knowledge on the function and characterization of male seminal proteins in An. gambiae, and provide a comparative assessment of the role of these male reproductive factors in other mosquito vectors of human disease in which female post-copulatory behavior has been studied. Knowledge of the factors and mechanisms regulating fertility in An. gambiae and other vectors can help the design of novel control strategies to fight the spread of disease.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1179/2047773212Y.0000000016
Other: 2942/S 39287
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Pathogens and Global Health
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Maney
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 106 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 82 - 93 Identifier: ISSN: 2047-7732 (print)
ISSN: 2047-7724 (online)