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  Mutualism and evolutionary multiplayer games: revisiting the Red King

Gokhale, C. S., & Traulsen, A. (2012). Mutualism and evolutionary multiplayer games: revisiting the Red King. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences, 279(1747), 4611-4616. doi:10.1098/rspb.2012.1697.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-EC7E-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-3AA8-F
Genre: Journal Article

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Gokhale_ProcRSocB_2012.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
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 Creators:
Gokhale, Chaitanya S.1, Author              
Traulsen, Arne1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              

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Free keywords: mutualism; evolutionary game theory; multiple players; rate of evolution
 Abstract: Coevolution of two species is typically thought to favour the evolution of faster evolutionary rates helping a species keep ahead in the Red Queen race, where ‘it takes all the running you can do to stay where you are’. In contrast, if species are in a mutualistic relationship, it was proposed that the Red King effect may act, where it can be beneficial to evolve slower than the mutualistic species. The Red King hypothesis proposes that the species which evolves slower can gain a larger share of the benefits. However, the interactions between the two species may involve multiple individuals. To analyse such a situation, we resort to evolutionary multiplayer games. Even in situations where evolving slower is beneficial in a two-player setting, faster evolution may be favoured in a multiplayer setting. The underlying features of multiplayer games can be crucial for the distribution of benefits. They also suggest a link between the evolution of the rate of evolution and group size.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-07-202012-08-222012-092012-11-22
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2012.1697
Other: 2943/S 39288
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Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Printed for the Royal Society and sold by Harrison & Sons
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 279 (1747) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4611 - 4616 Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8452 (print)
ISSN: 1471-2954 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/110975500577295_2