English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Accessory stimuli affect prerequisites of conflict, not conflict control: A Simon-task ERP study

Böckler, A., Alpay, G., & Stürmer, B. (2011). Accessory stimuli affect prerequisites of conflict, not conflict control: A Simon-task ERP study. Experimental Psychology, 58(2), 102-109. doi:10.1027/1618-3169/a000073.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-ECA6-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-CCE8-8
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Böckler, Anne1, Author              
Alpay, Gamze1, Author
Stürmer, Birgit1, Author
Affiliations:
1Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Stimulus-response interference; Accessory stimuli; Conflict control; Event-related brain potentials
 Abstract: Accessory signals that precede stimuli in interference tasks lead to faster overall responses while conflict increases. Two opposing accounts exist for the latter finding: one is based on dual-route frameworks of response preparation and proposes amplification of both direct response activation and indirect response selection processes; the other refers to attentional networks and suggests inhibition of executive attention, thereby hampering conflict control. The present study replicated previous behavioral findings in a Simon task and extended them by electrophysiological evidence. Accessory tones facilitated stimulus classification and attentional allocation in the Simon task as reflected by an increased N1 amplitude and an overall decrease of the N2 amplitude, respectively. The conflict-related N2 amplitude, which is larger in conflict trials compared with nonconflict trials, was not modulated by accessory tones. Moreover, accessory tones did not affect sequence-dependent conflict adaptation. In terms of a dual-route framework present results suggest amplification of both response preparation routes by accessory stimuli. An executive attention approach proposing accessory stimuli to hamper control of conflict is not supported.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1027/1618-3169/a000073
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Experimental Psychology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Göttingen, Germany : American Psychological Association (PsycARTICLES)
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 58 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 102 - 109 Identifier: ISSN: 1618-3169
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925573941