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  Giving a helping hand: Effects of joint attention on mental rotation of body parts

Böckler, A., Knoblich, G., & Sebanz, N. (2011). Giving a helping hand: Effects of joint attention on mental rotation of body parts. Experimental Brain Research, 211(3-4), 531-545. doi:10.1007/s00221-011-2625-z.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-ECAA-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-4C84-4
Genre: Journal Article

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Böckler_Knoblich_2011.pdf (Publisher version), 455KB
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 Creators:
Böckler, Anne1, Author              
Knoblich, Günther1, Author
Sebanz, Natalie1, Author
Affiliations:
1Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Joint attention; Mental rotation; Mental imagery; Egocentric reference frame; Allocentric reference frame
 Abstract: Research on joint attention has addressed both the effects of gaze following and the ability to share representations. It is largely unknown, however, whether sharing attention also affects the perceptual processing of jointly attended objects. This study tested whether attending to stimuli with another person from opposite perspectives induces a tendency to adopt an allocentric rather than an egocentric reference frame. Pairs of participants performed a handedness task while individually or jointly attending to rotated hand stimuli from opposite sides. Results revealed a significant flattening of the performance rotation curve when participants attended jointly (experiment 1). The effect of joint attention was robust to manipulations of social interaction (cooperation versus competition, experiment 2), but was modulated by the extent to which an allocentric reference frame was primed (experiment 3). Thus, attending to objects together from opposite perspectives makes people adopt an allocentric rather than the default egocentric reference frame.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-011-2625-z
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Title: Experimental Brain Research
  Other : Exp. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 211 (3-4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 531 - 545 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925398496