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  The (not so) social Simon effect: A referential coding account

Dolk, T., Hommel, B., Prinz, W., & Liepelt, R. (2013). The (not so) social Simon effect: A referential coding account. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39(5), 1248-1260. doi:10.1037/a0031031.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-F136-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8500-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Dolk, Thomas1, Author              
Hommel, Bernhard2, Author
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Liepelt, Roman3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Institute for Psychology, Münster University, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Joint Simon effect; Action representation; Referential response coding; Theory of event coding
 Abstract: The joint go-nogo Simon effect (social Simon effect, or joint cSE) has been considered as an index of automatic action/task co-representation. Recent findings, however, challenge extreme versions of this social co-representation account by suggesting that the (joint) cSE results from any sufficiently salient event that provides a reference for spatially coding one’s own action. By manipulating the salient nature of reference-providing events in an auditory go-nogo Simon task, the present study indeed demonstrates that spatial reference events do not necessarily require social (Experiment 1) or movement features (Experiment 2) to induce action coding. As long as events attract attention in a bottom-up fashion (e.g., auditory rhythmic features; Experiment 3 and 4), events in an auditory go-nogo Simon task seem to be co-represented irrespective of the agent or object producing these events. This suggests that the cSE does not necessarily imply the co-representation of tasks. The theory of event coding provides a comprehensive account of the available evidence on the cSE: the presence of another salient event requires distinguishing the cognitive representation of one’s own action from the representation of other events, which can be achieved by referential coding—the spatial coding of one’s action relative to the other events.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-09-252012-10-012013-01-242013-10-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/a0031031
PMID: 23339346
Other: Epub 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington : American Psychological Association (PsycARTICLES)
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 39 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1248 - 1260 Identifier: ISSN: 0096-1523
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927546243