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  Mutual adaptive timing in interpersonal action coordination

Nowicki, L., Prinz, W., Grosjean, M., Repp, B. H., & Keller, P. E. (2013). Mutual adaptive timing in interpersonal action coordination. Psychomusicology, 23(1), 6-20. doi:10.1037/a0032039.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-23E2-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002B-C8F7-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Nowicki, Lena1, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang2, Author              
Grosjean, Marc3, Author
Repp, Bruno H.4, Author
Keller, Peter E.1, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Music Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634555              
2Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
3Modern Human-Machine Systems Research Group, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, USA, ou_persistent22              
5The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Behavioral assimilation; Interpersonal coordination; Sensorimotor synchronization; Mutual adaptive timing; Compensation; Finger-tapping; Coperformers; Musicians
 Abstract: Coperformers in musical ensembles continuously adapt the timing of their actions to maintain interpersonal coordination. The current study used a dyadic finger-tapping task to investigate whether such mutual adaptive timing is predominated by assimilation (i.e., copying relative timing, akin to mimicry) or compensation (local error correction). Our task was intended to approximate the demands that arise when coperformers coordinate complementary parts with a rhythm section in an ensemble. In two experiments, paired musicians (the coperformers) were required to tap in alternation, in synchrony with an auditory pacing signal (the rhythm section). Serial dependencies between successive asynchronies produced by alternating individuals' taps relative to the pacing tones revealed greater evidence for temporal assimilation than compensation. By manipulating the availability of visual and auditory feedback across experiments, it was shown that this assimilation was strongest when coactors' taps triggered sounds, while the effects of visual information were negligible. These results suggest that interpersonal temporal assimilation was mediated by perception–action coupling in the auditory modality. Mutual temporal assimilation may facilitate coordination in musical ensembles by automatically increasing stylistic compatibility between coperformers, thereby assisting them to sound cohesive.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012-11-292013-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/a0032039
 Degree: -

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Title: Psychomusicology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 23 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 6 - 20 Identifier: ISSN: 0275-3987
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0275-3987