English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Transcriptional Autoregulatory Loops Are Highly Conserved in Vertebrate Evolution

Kielbasa, S. M., & Vingron, M. (2008). Transcriptional Autoregulatory Loops Are Highly Conserved in Vertebrate Evolution. PLoS One, 3(9), e3210-e3210. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003210.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-7F13-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-7F14-6
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
journal.pone.0003210.pdf (Any fulltext), 130KB
Name:
journal.pone.0003210.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
eDoc_access: PUBLIC
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kielbasa, Szymon M.1, Author              
Vingron, Martin2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1433547              
2Gene regulation (Martin Vingron), Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1479639              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: BACKGROUND: Feedback loops are the simplest building blocks of transcriptional regulatory networks and therefore their behavior in the course of evolution is of prime interest. METHODOLOGY: We address the question of enrichment of the number of autoregulatory feedback loops in higher organisms. First, based on predicted autoregulatory binding sites we count the number of autoregulatory loops. We compare it to estimates obtained either by assuming that each (conserved) gene has the same chance to be a target of a given factor or by assuming that each conserved sequence position has an equal chance to be a binding site of the factor. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that the numbers of putative autoregulatory loops conserved between human and fugu, danio or chicken are significantly higher than expected. Moreover we show, that conserved autoregulatory binding sites cluster close to the factors' starts of transcription. We conclude, that transcriptional autoregulatory feedback loops constitute a core transcriptional network motif and their conservation has been maintained in higher vertebrate organism evolution.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2008-09-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 (9) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: e3210 - e3210 Identifier: -